This article is a nice accompaniment to other articles I’ve produced on glass ware around the world through the passage of time, and if you want to see it for yourself just pop into the British Museum on your next visit to London 🙂

When I come across a piece of glass art or glass ware, I try to first appreciate the aesthetic qualities and breathe in the colours and light. At some point, I start to study the form, the techniques used and the delicacy of the risk-taking involved to create the final piece. Looking at glass pieces can tell you quite a bit about the creator too!

Two fine examples of Phoenician expertise in producing coloured glass. Glass perfume flasks, 6th-5th BCE from Tharros.

Two fine examples of Phoenician expertise in producing coloured glass. Glass perfume flasks, 6th-5th BCE from Tharros.

 

Fused sections of cut coloured glass rods form the decoratives pieces used to created the overall finished piece. This technique became popular in Egypt in 2nd - 5th CE.

Fused sections of cut coloured glass rods form the decorative pieces used to created the overall finished piece. This technique became popular in Egypt in 2nd – 5th CE.

 

Left-most, glass bottle of 'sandwiched' gold and blue enamel. 9th - 10th CE from Syria. Centre, glass bottle with 'cameo-glass' decoration where coloured glass is applied over blown glass and cut away to form shapes. Techniques used in Iran and Egypt. 9th - 10th CE from Iran.

Left-most, glass bottle of ‘sandwiched’ gold and blue enamel. 9th – 10th CE from Syria. Centre, glass bottle with ‘cameo-glass’ decoration where coloured glass is applied over blown glass and cut away to form shapes. Techniques used in Iran and Egypt. 9th – 10th CE from Iran.

 

A fragment of glasses associated with Jacques de Vitry Bishop of Acre (1216-26). The glass has a smoked effect and is wheel cut.

A fragment of glasses associated with Jacques de Vitry Bishop of Acre (1216-26). The glass has a smoked effect and is wheel cut.

 

Tobacco entered India at the end of the 16th CE and decorative huqqas appeared. Here, the green glass huqqa base is gilded.

Tobacco entered India at the end of the 16th CE and decorative huqqas appeared. Here, the green glass huqqa base is gilded.

 

Interestingly, once created these Late 13th CE Egyptian or Syrian glass pieces found themselves traded all the way to Restormel Castle in Cornwall, UK!

Interestingly, once created these Late 13th CE Egyptian or Syrian glass pieces found themselves traded all the way to Restormel Castle in Cornwall, UK!

 

Iranian glass believed to have made 18th - 19th CE at Shiraz. The trailing decoration down the flask neck is a local invention. Similar tall flasks were also produced in 17th - 18th CE Italy and Spain.

Iranian glass believed to have made 18th – 19th CE at Shiraz. The trailing decoration down the flask neck is a local invention. Similar tall flasks were also produced in 17th – 18th CE Italy and Spain.

 

Some fine examples of Islamic glass art below. More pieces such as the mosque lamps can be discovered in my article on the Museum of Islamic Art in Qatar.

British Museum_Islamic artefacts

Originally published: Wednesday, January 6th, 2016 at 02:03 in Celebrating Art, Inspiration

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